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Is Getting a First Class Honours Degree Worth It?

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The pride of graduation is a beautiful thing, made all the more poignant if you can add the elite label of First Class Honours. Hours of blood, sweat and tears in the library, early mornings and late nights spent perfecting essays or learning your lecture notes till you know them better than you know how to spell your own name will pay off, surely?

The pride of graduation is a beautiful thing, made all the more poignant if you can add the elite label of First Class Honours. Hours of blood, sweat and tears in the library, early mornings and late nights spent perfecting essays or learning your lecture notes till you know them better than you know how to spell your own name will pay off, surely?

Gaining a First is certainly an impressive achievement; however do not be under the impression that this will catapult you to the top of the pile of applicants grappling for graduate jobs. Most graduate schemes ask for a 2:1, with some even settling for a 2:2. Before you turn into a hermit and turn down every social invitation that comes your way, it is important that you consider how, and if, these sacrifices are going to pay off. Part of the university experience involves gaining confidence socially and networking. Improving your social skills and widening your friendship groups are sure to come in handy when you kick start your career, so don't feel guilty if you put off writing that essay for a bit to go out for a coffee with friends. It is important that you maintain a balance between focused study and your social life.

<br/>Extra curricular activities are what will get you noticed by employers. These can take the form of a part time job, playing for a university sports team, writing for your university paper or doing some voluntary work in the local community. Even if your extra curricular activities do not correspond exactly with what you would like to pursue career wise, they show that you have good time management skills as you balance work and co curricular, that you have a range of interests and possess practical skills, beyond your academic record. Remember, university is about growing into adulthood and gaining a wide range of life skills. It is important that you allow yourself time outside of your studies to experience new things. Retaining perspective is the key to a successful university career. Use your time at university not only to prepare for your future but to form some great memories.

mona tabbara grb author

Mona studied English at the University of Bristol.

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